“Shut Us Down or Let Us Fly” – Why Hollywood Said No to George Lucas


Did you catch the Golden Globes last night? I play my suspension of disbelief card and figure that it’s not bought out or that they play absolutely fair for each and every category. There really were many great moments last night. Did you catch Meryl Streep’s acceptance speech? I don’t know if people understand the significance of this, but the fact that the one and only Mrs. Meryl Streep mentioned “Pariah” speaks volumes. She shouted out an independent film, a minority protagonist, a woman protagonist, a minority filmmaker, a woman filmmaker. And while we’re making strides in the independent film world, Hollywood is running at a turtle’s pace to catch up. It’s taken George Lucas 23 years to get Hollywood exec’s attention—two decades too long—on his film Red Tails. Mark this on your calendars—2012 will see the first all-black action film. Wait, what? Yes. It took Lucas almost $100 million to make, and Hollywood kept saying no because there were no white leads. Hmmm, a film about black heroes with a white hero as one of the leads? No, thank you, Hollywood. I’m glad Lucas patiently waited and refused to give in. Take 8 minutes to watch the riveting interview with Jon Stewart below.

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon – Thurs 11p / 10c
George Lucas
www.thedailyshow.com
http://media.mtvnservices.com/mgid:cms:item:comedycentral.com:405544
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Are you frustrated yet? I sure am. John Stewart said it best, “The black soldier fighting heroically overseas and then coming home to second class treatment.” Thankfully, that’s not the struggle today. But it is exasperating to see how Hollywood treats its movies based on box office estimates rather than content. It has become a logics game, and as an aspiring feature director, I don’t like it. Good content should always equal high numbers. And if it doesn’t, then fix your marketing strategies or the way you handle press releases. Do not take it out on good storytelling, good scripts, good filmmaking. And I get that the country is going through hard financial times, but shouldn’t this inspire Hollywood to go back to the root of motion pictures? Entertainment. True, pleasure-filled movies that will delight its audience—not cheap entertainment to make a buck. The magnitude of an all-black action film should resonate with people everywhere. But they should forget about that as soon as the movie finishes its beginning credit sequence. They’ll be watching a film about our WWII heroes, our fighter pilots who sacrificed their lives and those around them to fight for our country. They are an important part of history that I never learned. And it’s a damn shame. At the very least, the film is coming out now. I guess better late than never….

Watch it in theatres, guys. Prove Hollywood wrong.

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4 thoughts on ““Shut Us Down or Let Us Fly” – Why Hollywood Said No to George Lucas

  1. revjonflores says:

    I’ll see it as soon as I can…probably won’t make it this weekend, maybe next. 🙂 I was so glad to see packed audiences in my AMC 16 in downtown Burbank (where I moonlight as a popcorn sweeper).

  2. […] chooses to tackle LGBTQ issues. This is definitely a film that could only be made independently (after all, it took George Lucas decades to get a film with an all black cast and director made&#823…. So, was Pariah everything we hoped […]

  3. […] chooses to tackle LGBTQ issues. This is definitely a film that could only be made independently (after all, it took George Lucas decades to get a film with an all black cast and director made&#823…. So, was Pariah everything we hoped for? Find out at IndiesUnchained! Advertisement […]

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